Collaboration: A Key Skill your Student Needs on her Resume

I wrote a previous post about the three C’s — the three skills your student needs to succeed in today’s economy.  ‘Collaborative, Communicative and Creative,’ according IBM’s 2012 CEO study of 1700 business leaders, are the most important personal characteristics for employees to succeed in today’s economy.

Creativitythe subject of a prior post, is an important skill that farsighted parents need to cultivate in their children.  In this post, we discuss what parents can do to help their children learn to be Collaborative.

Harvest: A Digital Tree Project by Leo Burnett

Harvest: A Digital Tree Project by Leo Burnett

Collaboration happens when two or more people or organizations work together to create, build, or solve something, each member contributing a unique idea, view or capability toward a shared goal.  Collaboration is learned by practicing and is about creating value with others.

According to Nilofer Merchant, author of 11 Rules for Creating Value in the #Social Era, ‘The industrial age was all about building things; the social age is all about connecting things, people and ideas. People and organizations will be rewarded by realizing that they don’t create value by themselves.

Creativity: A Key Skill Your Student Needs to Succeed in Today’s Economy

I wrote a previous post about the three C’s — the three skills your student needs to succeed in today’s economy.  ‘Collaborative, Communicative and Creative,’ according IBM’s 2012 CEO study of 1700 business leaders, are the most important personal characteristics for employees to succeed in today’s economy.  Thought leaders in education agree.

In this post, I’ll share what farsighted parents can do to develop their children’s creativity.

Fortunately, children are naturally creative. Crayons, toys, blocks, dolls, trees, bikes, water, tape, scissors — all can fuel a child’s imagination.  The real challenge for parents is helping their children not loose their creativity.  Pablo Picasso said, “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.”

Tape, cardboard, scissors and a 9–year old imagination helped Caine Monroy build an elaborate cardboard arcade in his dad’s Los Angeles auto parts store. Caine spent his summer building the imaginative contraption and invited customers in his dad’s shop and passerby’s to play.  Unfortunately, Caine didn’t have a single customer all summer.  Had Nirvan Mullick, (@nirvan) a local film maker not stopped by the shop to buy a part for his car, Caine’s story may never had been told and Caine’s creativity may have waned.

Caine's Arcade  (cainesarcade.com)

Caine’s Arcade (cainesarcade.com)